Environment

Brian Bull

Activists against the Dakota Access oil pipeline development in the Midwest held an international “Day of Action” today.  Among the dozen protest sites in the Pacific Northwest, was Cottage Grove.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull

A review of over 20,000 groundwater sites by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows half of the nation’s states have high --to very high-- potential to become corrosive.  As KLCC's Brian Bull reports, this includes Oregon and Washington.

Tiffany Eckert

More people are choosing alternative ways to spend the hereafter — that includes natural burial — which means no embalming or encasement in non-biodegradable packaging. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports on one Eugene woman's mission to resurrect an old practice for dealing with the dead.

Lost Lake is a seasonal alpine lake—just off the Santiam Pass Highway and it’s aptly named. Once a year, it disappears, not by evaporation or seepage. It flows away down a big hole in the lake bed. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert visited the site and talked to a hydrologist about the phenomenon at lost lake.

Very Old Firewood Tells A Tale Of Flammable Forests

Nov 28, 2015
John Marshall

A photographer from Wenatchee (Washington) has made a revealing discovery at the scene of a remote and long-abandoned fire lookout. Who knew a pile of very old firewood could tell a story? Correspondent Tom Banse brings it to us.

Ashley Ahearn / Earthfix

As sea levels rise and the global climate changes, international leaders gathering in Paris this month face increasing pressure to tackle the issue of “climate refugees”.

Some island nations are already looking to move their people to higher ground, even purchasing land elsewhere in preparation.

Here in the Pacific Northwest, one coastal tribe faces a similar choice.

Jes Burns

In October, the Environmental Protection Agency took steps to protect public health by tightening restrictions on smog. The new clean air standard is not as far-reaching as health and environmental advocates were calling for. But it’s more strict than many industry representatives wanted to see.

What Does Species Recovery Look Like For Wolves?

May 5, 2015
Wolf
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Desmond: Since wolves first started returning to Washington and Oregon in the late 1990s, the population has been increasing steadily – especially over the past few years.

Now wildlife officials are taking a look at the species’ protected status. In late April, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission initiated the process of removing wolves from the state’s endangered species list.

All this brings up questions of whether the wolf has actually recovered enough to dial back protections.

With me now with some answers is EarthFix Correspondent Jes Burns.

Recorded on Friday, January 30th, 2015

Air Date: Monday, February 2nd, 2015

Friday, January 30, 2015 from 12:05 to 1:20 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, 3rd Floor Ballroom

Anna King

In the midst of the Tri-Cities [in southeast Washington] there’s a dramatic group of mountains known as The Rattles. Their close proximity to the city means urban dwellers can hike a 15-hundred-foot peak and enjoy dramatic views on their lunch break or even after supper. But it also means these ridgelines are prime turf for expensive view-homes. Now, A band of avid hikers, are trying to protect as much of the area from development as they can. They want to raise money to buy land for a network of public trails.

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