Eugene City Hall

City of Eugene

The Eugene City Council and Lane County showed they were willing to work together on the downtown landscape at last night’s joint meeting.

Rachael McDonald

The Eugene City Council voted 5 to 3 Wednesday not to build its new City Hall to withstand a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. The plan is to build it to the minimum required under state law.

Rowell Brokaw Architects

The Cascadia subduction zone is likely to rupture sometime in the next 50 years causing major devastation to the northwest. Eugene leaders may decide this week whether to spend extra money to build the new City Hall to withstand an earthquake.

Rowell Brokaw Architects

The price of Eugene’s new city hall keeps climbing. It’s almost $7 million over the original estimated budget and it hasn’t yet been built. The City Council got an update on the design at Monday’s work session.

Angela Kellner

As City of Eugene staff continue to refine plans for the new city hall, students at Camas Ridge Elementary shared their design ideas with the mayor this week.

Inside Donna Dubois' 4th/5th grade class, teams of students proudly show off their city hall plaza designs to Mayor Kitty Piercy. They glued down small pebbles to make pathways, painted plastic lids to represent fountains and added green material to represent grass.

Barbara Elliot and Isabella Shaft got the Mayor's attention with the small details of their multi-dimensional design.

City of Eugene

The bridge that connected the old Eugene City Hall to the Lane County Building has been sent to the scrap heap. The city tried to give it away, but there were no takers.

Mike Penwell, Eugene City Hall Project Manager, says the bridge was steeper than what's allowable under Americans with Disabilities Act requirements. It was also narrower than what is standard for bike and pedestrian bridges. The city had wanted to give the bridge away.

Rachael McDonald

The old Eugene City Hall is almost completely demolished. The city council decided to tear it down and build new last year. KLCC's Rachael stopped by this Tuesday morning to check it out.
 

Mike Penwell is Project Manager with the City of Eugene. He says structural demolition is going faster than expected. And he says, the 50 year old building was more unstable than they thought. He says crews found additional weaknesses in the original construction.

greatbuildings.com

There will be no wrecking ball at Eugene’s City Hall. The structure is being disassembled. This week, western red cedar slats and some heavy paving stones are being removed.

The pavers that made up the concrete plaza outside the Council Chamber are being transported to BRING Recycling. Each paver weighs over 100 pounds and more than 2,000 of them have already been moved. BRING’s Executive Director, Julie Daniel, says they’re prepared to store the blocks, plus whatever other cabinets, fixtures and fittings they can take from the building.

Rachael McDonald

The Eugene City Council re-affirmed Wednesday it wants to tear down the old city hall and construct a new $15-million building on the same site. The vote was 6 to 2.

The city held a ceremony a few weeks ago marking the start of demolition of the 50-year old city hall building at 8th and Pearl. But the event was marred by protestors who want to keep the old structure, and questions came up about the decision making process. Council President Chris Pryor says the council wanted to clarify its plans.

City of Eugene

The Eugene City Council is expected to decide the fate of the shuttered, 50-year-old city hall this week. The council voted earlier this month to postpone the demolition of city hall for two weeks to have another debate about the building's future.

City spokeswoman Jan Bohman says councilors will hear from the design team  at their Monday evening meeting.

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