Eugene City Hall

Angela Kellner

As City of Eugene staff continue to refine plans for the new city hall, students at Camas Ridge Elementary shared their design ideas with the mayor this week.

Inside Donna Dubois' 4th/5th grade class, teams of students proudly show off their city hall plaza designs to Mayor Kitty Piercy. They glued down small pebbles to make pathways, painted plastic lids to represent fountains and added green material to represent grass.

Barbara Elliot and Isabella Shaft got the Mayor's attention with the small details of their multi-dimensional design.

City of Eugene

The bridge that connected the old Eugene City Hall to the Lane County Building has been sent to the scrap heap. The city tried to give it away, but there were no takers.

Mike Penwell, Eugene City Hall Project Manager, says the bridge was steeper than what's allowable under Americans with Disabilities Act requirements. It was also narrower than what is standard for bike and pedestrian bridges. The city had wanted to give the bridge away.

Rachael McDonald

The old Eugene City Hall is almost completely demolished. The city council decided to tear it down and build new last year. KLCC's Rachael stopped by this Tuesday morning to check it out.
 

Mike Penwell is Project Manager with the City of Eugene. He says structural demolition is going faster than expected. And he says, the 50 year old building was more unstable than they thought. He says crews found additional weaknesses in the original construction.

greatbuildings.com

There will be no wrecking ball at Eugene’s City Hall. The structure is being disassembled. This week, western red cedar slats and some heavy paving stones are being removed.

The pavers that made up the concrete plaza outside the Council Chamber are being transported to BRING Recycling. Each paver weighs over 100 pounds and more than 2,000 of them have already been moved. BRING’s Executive Director, Julie Daniel, says they’re prepared to store the blocks, plus whatever other cabinets, fixtures and fittings they can take from the building.

Rachael McDonald

The Eugene City Council re-affirmed Wednesday it wants to tear down the old city hall and construct a new $15-million building on the same site. The vote was 6 to 2.

The city held a ceremony a few weeks ago marking the start of demolition of the 50-year old city hall building at 8th and Pearl. But the event was marred by protestors who want to keep the old structure, and questions came up about the decision making process. Council President Chris Pryor says the council wanted to clarify its plans.

City of Eugene

The Eugene City Council is expected to decide the fate of the shuttered, 50-year-old city hall this week. The council voted earlier this month to postpone the demolition of city hall for two weeks to have another debate about the building's future.

City spokeswoman Jan Bohman says councilors will hear from the design team  at their Monday evening meeting.

Corinne Boyer

The Eugene City Council pressed the pause button Monday night on taking down City Hall. 

Corinne Boyer

The first 16-foot cedar slat was removed from the condemned Eugene City Hall Wednesday. City leaders held a ceremony marking the beginning of deconstruction of the 50-year old building. Construction of a new City Hall is slated to begin in 2015.

Mayor Kitty Piercy was flanked by sign-holding protestors as she addressed the small assembly.

Piercy: "And I just might say, how could you celebrate a milestone in the civic history of our community without controversy. It's part of who we are as a participatory community."

University of Oregon

Even though a new Eugene City Hall is now in preliminary design phase, some Eugenians still have reservations.  Among these is architect Jerry Diethelm. Although having no direct involvement with the project, he thinks the proposed city hall is the wrong building in the wrong place.  He’s asked how his city hall vision differs from that of the City Council.  On July 18, John Rowell of Rowell-Brokaw architects, a principal designer of the new Eugene City Hall, was on KLCC discussing his firm’s plans.  That interview can be heard below this story.

sworegonarchitect

Betty Taylor, at age 88, is the senior member in age and service on the Eugene City Council.  She’s represented the City’s Ward 2 since 1997. Of the Council’s eight members,  she’s the only one advocating retention and remodeling of the current City Hall, even as the Council seems to have moved on by approving design work on a new building.       Tuesday, KLCC’s Claude Offenbacher asked her why she remains the lone holdout:

Taylor: “I agree that it’s already out of the barn, but I still think it was the wrong decision, and that’s what I’ll say if I’m asked.”

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