EWEB

EWEB

The Eugene Water and Electric Board is hoping to get one of two malfunctioning roll gates on the Leaburg Dam repaired by mid-January.

One of three roll-gates broke down on the 85-year old dam on the McKenzie River in 2012. EWEB has been working on repairs and hopes to have it back in operation in a couple of weeks. Late last month, a 2nd roll-gate malfunctioned. EWEB spokesman Lance Robertson says the utility hasn’t yet determined why.  He says the dam is basically out of commission- with only one gate working.

People text donations, they text votes to reality shows, now they can text a power outage. In time for winter weather, the Eugene Water and Electric Board has launched a new reporting service.

EWEB spokesman Joe Harwood says when their system was overloaded in February’s snowstorm, they started working on a solution. During that storm they also had to educate some younger customers who didn’t know they had to tell EWEB when their power was out:

Several areas in Eugene were without power for about two hours Saturday afternoon. The outages started just before three p.m., affecting several thousand Eugene Water and Electric Board customers and a University of Oregon basketball game.

Four substations malfunctioned, taking out power to the U of O campus, and Whiteaker and Coburg Road neighborhoods. Traffic signals went dark during the outage and the second half of the women’s basketball game was delayed by over an hour while waiting for the power to come back on.

EWEB

The Eugene Water and Electric Board will host the construction and utilities career fair Thursday for Lane County high school students. 

More than 500 Lane County high school students will have the opportunity to work in construction, utility trade and road maintenance for a day. Joe Harwood, spokesman for EWEB says the idea is to inspire young people to pursue this kind of career.

UO Foundation

Eugene Water and Electric has chosen the University of Oregon Foundation as developer of its property along the Willamette River. EWEB Commissioners made the selection from three candidates at their Tuesday meeting.

The vote was 4 to 0. Joe Harwood is spokesman for EWEB. He says commissioners felt the U of O Foundation has a long term commitment to the community.

EWEB Closes Reservoir For Days Surrounding July 4

Jun 25, 2014

The Eugene Water and Electric Board will lock the gates to the College Hill Reservoir on Friday to protect the surface from firework damage. The reservoir is usually open to the public but EWEB began restricting access during the fourth of July. In 2010, 2011, and 2012 the facility sustained damages to the rubber surface during the holiday week.

Joe Harwood, a spokesman from EWEB says damage to the surface of the reservoir could result in contamination.

Desmond O'Boyle

Solar powered cars? There may be problems driving at night, but during a perfectly sunny day in Eugene Saturday, middle school-ers tried their models out during the annual Solar Challenge.

The competition held at Cal Young Middle School, is sponsored by the Eugene Water and Electric Board and featured about 250 students. Cars were entered into four categories: Speed racing, a hill climb, and art and science concept cars. Tim Whitley is EWEB's grant coordinator. He says the project increases awareness of alternative energy and gives kids a hands-on opportunity.

EWEB

Four groups have expressed interest in developing a 27-acre tract along the Willamette River in Eugene. Eugene Water and Electric Board envisions a vibrant, mixed-use "people place" at their Riverfront site.

EWEB has moved most of its operations to West Eugene and has been working for years on a vision for the property along the Willamette River.  Jeanine Parisi is Community Relations Coordinator at EWEB. She says choosing a developer is a key step in transforming the riverfront from an industrial site to something else.

ltd.org

Pre-Construction activities are scheduled to begin in May for the West Eugene Em-X transit project.

wikepedia

For decades, the government has relied on regulations to protect water quality. But what if cities tried something other than simply telling people what they can -- and cannot -- do?

What if cities actually rewarded people for managing their land in ways that keep rivers cool and clean?

Two Oregon cities are trying this approach.

Marilyn Cross lives alongside the McKenzie River. It’s home to salmon and steelhead and the source of drinking water for the downstream city of Eugene.

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