The battle to prohibit the cultivation of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, continues in Oregon. In the upcoming special election, Benton County voters will decide if a measure to ban GMO's is right for them. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with people on both sides of the issue and filed this report.

On the face of it, Measure 2-89 seeks to protect local food sources by banning the cultivation of genetically modified crops anywhere in the county. The measure also promotes saving heritage seeds and a sort of “We the People” right to self-governance.

Lane County Certifies Measure 92 Recount Results

Dec 11, 2014

Wednesday, the Lane County Clerk certified the results of the vote recount for ballot Measure 92 which would require the labeling of genetically modified organisms. The recount showed little change. The results remain with more than 85,000 in favor and more than 62,000 against. These results follow a statewide recount of votes on the measure. The recount was required because the difference was within one half of one percent. State law requires close results to be automatically recounted.

Lindsay Eyink

Last spring, voters in two southern Oregon counties passed measures to ban the cultivation of genetically engineered crops. Now, Oregon voters statewide are being asked to approve a measure to require genetically engineered foods to be labeled. As with the similar, unsuccessful ballot measures in Washington and California, lots of out-of-state money is flooding into the campaigns on both sides.

Karen Richards

Salmon and sweet potato or chicken with blueberries. All gluten free and organic, of course. These are not choices on the menu of Eugene’s newest restaurant, but options in the pet food aisle. Pet owners are spending more on specialized food every year.

Liam Moriarty / JPR

The people with perhaps the most direct economic stake in the fate of Jackson County’s proposed ban on growing genetically modified crops are the county’s farmers. Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty visited Rogue Valley farmers who stand on opposite sides of Measure 15-119 to find out how they see it.

Desmond O'Boyle

Oregon Representative Peter DeFazio and about 40 students from the University of Oregon are pushing super markets to voluntarily label products containing Genetically Modified Organisms.

The Oregon Legislature and the U.S. Congress continue to debate GMO labeling. The Oregon Student Independent Research Group is taking the discussion directly to grocery stores. Recently, OSPIRG requested Market of Choice voluntarily label products. At the U of O Friday, OSPIRG Spokeswoman Hannah Picknell said so far the super market chain has been receptive.

Recorded on Friday, November 8, 2013

Airing on Monday, November 11, 2013

Farmers and consumers don’t always see eye-to-eye when it comes to genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Two viewpoints on the business and politics of 21st-century Lane County agriculture are on tap for the City Club of Eugene on November 8.

Austin Jenkins

A record twenty-two million dollars in opposition spending appears to have paid off for grocery, seed and pesticide makers. Washington voters  Tuesday night were rejecting a ballot measure to require GMO-labeling of foods. Opponents declared victory.

The music at the Yes on 522 party in Seattle’s Pioneer Square was upbeat. But the speeches were of the more subdued variety. Trudy Bialic of PCC Natural Markets is a campaign spokesperson. She addressed the crowd after early returns showed the measure down by nearly double digits.

"Grand Bargain" Passes Oregon Legislature

Oct 2, 2013

The so-called "Grand Bargain" has passed in Salem. Oregon lawmakers have approved all five of the bills on their special session agenda. The package includes targeted tax hikes and tax breaks, as well as cuts to pensions for some retired public employees.

Many of the bills passed with very narrow margins. And some lawmakers who voted for the measures said they were doing so against their better judgment. Here's Republican representative Sal Esquivel.

Rachael McDonald

A group called "Support Local Food Rights" is one step closer to placing a measure on the November 2014 ballot in Lane County. Their initiative would restrict Genetically Modified Organisms, or GMOs, from being planted in the county.

The group's original ballot measure for its "Local Food System Ordinance" was rejected by the County Clerk because it addressed more than one subject.
Kneeland: "We're very excited that we've worked in cooperation with the county to submit an initiative that has been approved for the single subject rule."