Health & Medicine

Health, Medicine

Newport Seeks Public Input on Fluoridating Water

Oct 7, 2015
City of Newport

Newport is considering adding fluoride to the city water system. The City Council is seeking public input.

Call for Blood Donors in Wake of Shooting

Oct 2, 2015
Lane Blood Center

Lane Blood Center is asking for donations in the aftermath of Thursday's shooting at Umpqua Community College.

Cynthia Vignos with Lane Blood Center says they are primarily seeking donors with O Negative and O Positive blood types.

Vignos: "Currently what we're asking from the community is that they can make an appointment to donate within the next couple weeks. People came down yesterday in large numbers and now our responsibility is to maintain an adequate blood supply which will take us a couple of weeks to build back up."

Jon Rosman / OPB

The state is creating a task force to research the medical and health properties of cannabis.

The legislature last session asked the Oregon Health Authority to create the task force. Doctor Katrina Hedburg with the OHA's Public Health Division says it will look at gaps in knowledge and research about the plant.  Since marijuana is illegal under federal law, there's not a lot of research available.

Hedburg says there is one FDA approved medication under the brand Marinol. It's made from THC, a chemical in marijuana.

The Portland-based nonprofit Albertina Kerr will stop providing services to people with developmental disabilities in Lane County. So what's next for the clients and staff?

32 clients, including 23 from around the clock group homes, will need new accommodations. Issues with state funding is one of the reasons Albertina Kerr said it is leaving Lane County after 18 years. Even so, the person in charge of overseeing the transition of clients is confident there are enough local agencies to take them on.

A Portland-based agency announced today it is closing all of its Lane County programs serving people with developmental disabilities.

Albertina Kerr operates 8 group homes in Lane County and provides community inclusion programs.

In a statement, Albertina Kerr CEO Chris Krenk said it is difficult to operate the programs from the Portland headquarters. He added it is hard to recruit and retain staff, and funding issues have increased fiscal challenges.

MCAA

The Oregon State Psychiatric Hospital has made progress during a decade of change. But more can be done to improve mental health treatment and staff safety. That's according to a recent audit by the Secretary of State's office.

http://www.co.benton.or.us

People in and around Sweet Home will soon have a new health care center, due to a $1.1 million dollar federal grant.

The two-year grant comes from Affordable Care Act funds, and will be used to expand an existing clinic. Sherlyn Dahl is Director of Community Health Centers for Benton and Linn Counties. She says it’s important for residents of rural areas to be able to easily find high-quality wrap-around services:

www.lanecountyfarmersmarket.org

Fresh, local produce has been a fixture in downtown Eugene since 1915. The Lane County Farmers Market celebrates its 100th anniversary this weekend.

It used to be called the Eugene Producers’ Public Market, but it originally opened in the same space it occupies today: 8th Avenue and Oak Street. Today the Farmer’s Market includes more than 85 growers, and has incorporated the wintertime holiday market, and Tuesdays and Thursdays in the summer. Carrie Swarts is the Market Manager. She says the long-term dream is for an indoor-outdoor space at the Park Blocks:

Lane Regional Air Protection Agency

Air quality in the south Willamette Valley declined earlier this week due to smoke from wildfires in southern Oregon and northern California. A new fire south of Eugene has further increased risks. Residents may need to prepare for a long stretch of hazy conditions.

Rachael McDonald

Scientists at Oregon State University have developed a wristband that can detect chemicals in the environment. Advocacy groups see them as a tool to help people to find out what they're being exposed to and eventually use the information to affect policy. And a new company hopes to sell the wristbands commercially.

Liam Moriarty / JPR

This week, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty is introducing us to several people with a front-row view of Southern Oregon’s epidemic of heroin and opioid addiction. In this final part of the series, we meet 27-year-old Diana Cooper. She’s a mother of four from Medford -- and a recovering heroin addict.

Residents in the rural community of Pleasant Hill have a new option when it comes to health care. As KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert reports, an urgent care clinic is now open for business.

Pleasant Hill Urgent Care may not have an expensive cat-scan or ultrasound. They don’t admit patients or perform surgery. But they do provide primary care. They offer x-ray services and can give I-V fluids and meds. If you need a bone set or a wound sutured, medical staff at this clinic can do it.

And no one will be turned away, even the uninsured.

Silent Epidemic: Heroin In Southern Oregon Part Three

Jul 22, 2015
Liam Moriarty / JPR

This week, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty is introducing us to people with a front-row view of Southern Oregon’s epidemic of addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers. Today, we meet Darryl Inaba. He’s a Doctor of Clinical Pharmacy and co-author of “Uppers, Downers, All Arounders,” a book on addiction and the brain that’s widely used as a training text.

Liam Moriarty / JPR

This week, Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty is introducing us to several people with a front-row view of Southern Oregon’s epidemic of heroin and opioid addiction. Today, we meet Dr. Jim Shames, an addiction specialist and the medical director for Jackson County Health and Human Services. He says doctors like him played a key role in creating that epidemic. Now, he’s leading innovative efforts to turn it around.

file photo

Like many areas in the country, southern Oregon is experiencing what public health officials describe as an epidemic of addiction to heroin and prescription opioid pain relievers such as OxyContin. One symptom of this epidemic has been a sharp rise in deaths by overdose. This week, Jefferson Public Radio's Liam Moriarty looks at this problem through the eyes of people on the front lines.

plannedparenthood.org

Last week, Planned Parenthood of Southwest Oregon received a federal grant for its teen pregnancy prevention programs.

The Office of Adolescent Health awarded nearly 19 million dollars, spread over multiple programs in the Northwest. Eugene-based Planned Parenthood Vice President Mary Gossart says their portion—150- to 180 thousand dollars--will fund a five-year program:

Tiffany Eckert

About 5,500 Oregonians live with HIV/AIDS. A quarter of them reside in rural areas. Eugene-based HIV alliance is the only AIDS service organization helping patients in the eastern and southern parts of the state. The agency recently received a grant to fund a unique, telehealth project for HIV-positive people in remote places.

Angela Kellner/KLCC

Baby Ellanor Blanchett of Texas and her family traveled to Oregon this year to try a new medical marijuana treatment developed in Eugene. The parents were hopeful it could alleviate their daughter’s daily seizures.

Angela Kellner/KLCC

In 1998 Oregon voters approved a ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana. Today nearly half the states have passed similar laws. Another fifteen allow the limited use of cannabis to treat conditions like epilepsy.

Oregon is the only place in the nation that lets out-of-state residents get a medical marijuana card here. For one Texas family, it gave them a chance to try a new cannabis treatment for their baby. She suffers from a rare brain disorder and seizures.

Peacehealth

Lane County organizations are collaborating on a 2nd county-wide Community Health Needs Assessment. This week, there's a visioning session to gather input on the process.

Doctor Rick Kincade is Director of Community Based Services at Peacehealth in Eugene. He says the first health assessment, completed 2 years ago, found problems related to high rates of tobacco use. Kincade says since then, health providers stepped up smoking cessation efforts. He says they found health disparities based on income and ethnicity.

In Oregon, nearly one in seven people infected with HIV Aids is unaware they have the disease. The longer someone goes without treatment, the greater the risk of spreading HIV. A simple test is available to anyone who wants to know their status.

Paul Homan, who has been HIV positive for 12 years, is Senior Program Manager with HIV Alliance. He says testing and treatment are the keys to breaking the viral transmission cycle.  

Tiffany Eckert

A serious illness can be life-changing. It often leads to doctors and specialists, who evaluate, test and diagnose. Treatment becomes the means to recovery.  But what if a patient's condition is rare to a geographic region? In part two of our reports on “Invisible Illness”, KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks to one Oregon woman about her plight to discover what’s been ailing her.

For thirty years, Deb Elder has been hurting. She says her chronic pain started after a traumatic accident. Then she was told she had Fibromyalgia. Deb describes her symptoms:

Tiffany Eckert

“Invisible Illness" is a moniker given to chronic conditions that seriously impair daily living --but have symptoms that are difficult to diagnose. Health advocates report worldwide sufferers number in the tens of millions. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert talks to patients with an invisible illness- who struggle to have their condition recognized and treated.

Kelly McCabe is a 41 year old mother of three.

Kelly: 07 “I suffered from some chronic fatigue and what I thought was cases of shingles since about 2006.”

Low-Income Kids Won't Go Hungry When School Gets Out.

Jun 8, 2015
Photo courtesy Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon

When school breaks for the summer, it can mean children living in lower-income households won't be receiving lunches they normally would at school. Organizations across the state are preparing to serve around two million meals during the summer.

More than 130 sponsors including the YMCA and Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon are ready to provide nutritious lunches and in some cases learning activities for kids when school is out. Annie Kirschner is a spokeswoman for Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon. She says the food costs for the programs are reimbursed by the USDA.

Jes Burns

Oregon Health Officials have confirmed a seventh case of meningococcal disease linked to the outbreak at the University of Oregon. 

SEIU Local 49

Caregivers and service employees in Eugene and Springfield voted to unionize Thursday night at  Sacred Heart PeaceHealth Medical Center. The nearly 11-hundred employees will now be members of the nation’s largest health care union. 

After the ballots were tallied, the “yes” votes took it.

“My name is Meg Neimi. I’m President of SEIU Local 49, the health care union. And, I’m standing right outside of Sacred Heart RiverBend Medical Center with a group of health care workers who are celebrating the fact that they have just won their union election resoundingly.”

eugene-or.gov

Eugene’s Parks and Open Space Department has been considering a smoking ban for years. They happened to present their idea to the City just as the City Council began debating a downtown smoking ban.

There’s plenty of precedent for these kinds of bans. All Oregon State Parks are smoke free. Craig Carnagey is with Eugene’s Parks Department. He says the ban is a logical step:

peacehealth.org

Next week, “frontline” workers like surgical support aides and housekeepers at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Hospitals in Eugene and Springfield will vote whether or not to unionize.

Chris Tonry has worked in patient admissions at Sacred Heart for 36 years. She has never been a part of union. Next week, she plans to check the “yes” box to join Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 49. Tonry believes a union could help with inadequate pay raises and understaffing.

Pearl Wolfe

On January 28th, advocates and volunteers from 28 agencies conducted the annual homeless count in Lane County. They hit the streets and parks, looked under bridges, and checked in with shelters and churches. Lane County Human Services released the numbers Tuesday.

At one point in time, 1,473 un-housed people were counted. These are the “literally homeless” who stay in emergency transitional shelters or locations not meant for habitation-- like cars or doorways.

For the first time in 10 years, more Oregon kindergarteners have been getting vaccinated against diseases including measles and whooping cough.

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