Lane County

Whooping Cough is on the rise in Oregon. Deschutes County health officials report more than 20 cases since the first of the year. Lane County has confirmed nine.

The bacterial infection, Pertussis, is also known as whooping cough. The Chinese named it the "hundred day cough"—because of the severe spells it elicits.

(Cough sounds…)

According to the World Health Organization, 195,000 children die from the disease each year. Whooping cough is easily spread through coughs and sneezes.

Lane County

Recorded on: April 10, 2015

Air Date: April 13, 2015

Almost half of the land in Lane County is under the control of the U.S. Forest Service, which means that none of that land is on the county’s property tax roll. When logging was a major industry here, Forest Service land generated hundreds of millions of dollars. The federal government provided tens of millions of dollars directly the county as compensation for supporting services to land that did not otherwise contribute to the county treasury.

Recorded on: April 3, 2015

Air Date: April 6, 2015

Speakers from the Center for the Prevention of Abuse and Neglect will describe the center’s plans for reducing violence against children. The goal of the 90by30 Initiative is a 90 percent reduction in child abuse and neglect in Lane County by 2030. The speakers will emphasize the need to engage a critical mass of neighbors to actively invest in healthy families and healthy communities.

Unemployment rates continue to drop in Lane and Douglas counties. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks with a regional economist about the growth trend and what it means for communities.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Lane County is the lowest since June of 2008. Douglas County is trending about the same, seeing its second consecutive month with job growth.

Brian Rooney watches tracks employment in both regions. He says growth brings a mixed bag of benefits.

lanecounty.org

Lane County legislators are hoping the federal government moves forward with extending timber payments. The U.S. House is voting this week on a two-year extension of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act. The extension isn't a long term solution to the County's budget problems. Lane County Commissioner Sid Leiken thinks county and city municipalities should work together to develop a consistent economic develop message.

Thursday was the filing deadline for four Eugene 4J school board positions. The final list shows Alicia Hays unopposed, Jim Torrey with two opponents, and Mary Walston with one challenger. The seat being vacated by Craig Smith has three candidates.

Oregon has no statewide ballot measures this spring. Lane County residents will vote on a motor vehicle registration fee. Benton County will weigh in on an ordinance addressing genetically modified foods.

Ballots will be mailed May 1st in Lane County for the May 19th special election.

www.merkley.senate.gov

Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley will host town hall meetings in Benton, Linn, and Lane counties this weekend. The Senator visits each of Oregon's 36 counties every year, inviting residents to talk about their concerns and suggest ideas to bring to Congress. Merkley will also update residents on his work in Washington, D.C. He will visit Corvallis, Halsey, and Eugene on Saturday, March 14th. 

Details are on Merkley's website, here.

Lane County's new internal auditor, Shanda Miller, started her job in mid-February. She was introduced to the public and the board of commissioners last week.

Miller spent the first few weeks in her new job meeting with various department heads, learning about what they do and the challenges of their jobs. County Spokeswoman Anne Marie Levis:

Levis: "As a performance auditor, her job very much is to look at efficiencies with the county, ways to do things better, ways to have cost savings."

Recorded on: February 6th, 2015

Air Date: February 9th, 2015

Challenges facing the county are the focus of the new Lane County Administrator, Steve Mokrohisky. He spent his first six months on the job immersing himself in issues facing the county, building his executive team, and working with commissioners to plan for the future.

Lane County

The Lane County Board of Commissioners has postponed a decision on whether to put a $35 annual vehicle registration fee on the May ballot. The fee would fund repair to roads and bridges.

The board heard from 20 people at a hearing Tuesday. Nancy Nichols of Deadwood was among those in favor of the fee. She lives near a gravel road.

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