Oregon Coast Aquarium

Oregon Coast Aquarium

Last weekend’s 75 mile per hour winds brought an unexpected visitor to the region…more than a thousand miles away from its likely home. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Hal Hermanson

The Oregon Coast Aquarium has been ranked among the top ten in North America. As part of our 50th Anniversary Road Trip Series, KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert shares the sights and sounds during a private tour of Newport’s 25-year old aquarium.

Oregon Coast Aquarium

One of the two olive ridley sea turtles rescued on Oregon beaches last winter has died.

Oregon Coast Aquarium

Following months of rehabilitation at the Oregon Coast Aquarium, sea turtles Thunder and Lightning have been transferred to San Diego.

Oregon Coast Aquarium

The Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport is now treating two olive ridley sea turtles. Discovered on different beaches, they're both doing well.

nationalgeographic.com

An endangered olive ridley sea turtle is under intensive care at the Oregon Coast Aquarium's animal rehabilitation unit after it was spotted in distress on a beach.

Corinne Boyer

In December 2014, a tropical sea turtle was discovered by a couple on a Washington Beach. The olive ridley turtle drifted over a thousand miles north from her native waters off the Mexican coast. Hypothermic, emaciated and near death, the reptile was transported to the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport for rehabilitation. In February, the U.S. Coast Guard flew Solstice to SeaWorld San Diego. KLCC’s Corinne Boyer traveled to San Diego to see how Solstice was doing.

The Oregon Coast Aquarium Adopts Harbor Seals

Mar 11, 2015
Oregon Coast Aquarium

The Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport adopted three harbor seals from California this winter. The aquarium wanted the younger mammals to join their older seal population.

Miller, Tater and Elvis are 19, 20 and 21 years old, which isn't very young for harbor seals, but the Newport Aquarium's oldest harbor seal is turning 40 this year. Spokeswoman Erin Paxton says the aquarium uses positive reinforcement to train their marine mammals which allows them to communicate with their trainers.

Corinne Boyer

An olive ridley turtle now in Newport recovering from hypothermia will be moved to San Diego tomorrow (Tuesday).

The turtle was named “Solstice” because she was found on a northwest beach on December 21st. Erin Paxton is with the Oregon Coast Aquarium. She says the endangered animal was scheduled to recuperate there a little longer, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has ruled her healthy enough to travel. Paxton says this is good news:

The Oregon Coast Aquarium

Solstice, the olive ridley turtle that was found on a Washington beach last month, is recuperating at the Oregon Coast Aquarium. She has now reached her ideal 75 degree body temperature.

When Solstice was found, she was dehydrated, hypothermic and emaciated. Although she is now eating and swimming around, she now has an air pocket under her shell. Erin Paxton with the Oregon Coast Aquarium says Solstice has a long recovery ahead.

Oregon Coast Aquarium

A team of divers has discovered thousands of young sea stars off the Oregon coast near Florence. Some say it could be a sign of recovery from a disease that's been wiping out sea stars all along the Pacific coast.

Rachael McDonald

People walking Oregon's beaches this fall may come across juvenile shorebirds that seem to be distressed or ill. Wildlife experts say it's best to leave them be.

The Common Murre is a small shorebird with black and white feathers, kind of like a mini- penguin. This time of year, the young ones have just fledged and are learning to feed themselves.
Laura Todd is with US Fish and Wildlife's Newport field office. She says some of them don't survive. If you come across a bird that's not moving and seems weak and unwell…