Oregon Country Fair

The Oregon Country Fair and Culture Jam present a weekend workshop for teenagers called “Catch the Fire! Becoming a Creative Changemaker,” at Petersen Barn in Eugene, March 13th through 15th. Eric Alan speaks with Robin Bernardi, OCF’s Youth Program Director, and Culture Jam participant Cash McAllister about this new workshop.

Meeting Date: July 18, 2014

Air Date: July 21, 2004

In 1969 in an apple orchard outside of Eugene, a handful of local people held a benefit for Children’s House, a community alternative school. That philanthropic event, billed as the Renaissance Faire, grew into the Oregon Country Fair (OCF). In the decades since, the Fair has been incorporated as a nonprofit organization with thousands of volunteers and six employees. Every July, hundreds of entertainers, performers, and handcraft artisans come together to co-create a lively festival.

Tiffany Eckert

KLCC reporters walked the paths of the Oregon Country Fair this weekend to find stories that capture  experiences at the nation's oldest event of its kind. Emery Blackwell was born with cerebral palsy and is unable to walk or do many of the things many of us take for granted. But he's able to ride a tricycle that he custom designed for his body. It's known as Em's Cosmic Limo, and with the help of a dedicated crew, he spends nights at the Country Fair pedaling people around. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert has the story.

    

Crews Craft a Story Pole At Oregon Country Fair

Jul 13, 2014
Amanda Butt

The clan members of the "Ritz Sauna and Shower Spa" have set up their booth at the Oregon County Fair for the past 38 years. Now, they're working on a story pole to mark their legacy for many future generations of Fairgoers to see. KLCC's Amanda Butt was there with Booth Manager George Bradock and has more.

copyright, 2014 KLCC

Karen Richards

Oregon Country Fair is a place people can escape their everyday lives. One of the larger industries at the fair is food service. Many people leave their normal jobs to work at the fair's various food booths.

Merrill Smith works at La Tortilla, better known as "€œthe chalupa booth." He runs a bakery in Ashland. But most of his employees this weekend are not in food service. Smith says his workers are flight attendants, yoga instructors, tree planters, and parents. He enjoys working here because...

Desmond O'Boyle

Oregon Country Fair's Community Village is a collection of booths providing information about social issues.

Tucked away is a booth called Wild Edibles. Here people can learn about natural foliage that can be consumed or used as medicine. There's also a small section dedicated to a vital component to wild edible plants: Bees.

KLCC's Desmond O'Boyle took some time to visit the Fair's only living bee hive and found some women bringing attention to saving the bees.

copyright, 2014 KLCC

johnperkins.org

At the Oregon Country Fair Friday, KLCC's Eric Alan & John Cooney spoke with John Perkins. He's the author of Confessions of an Economic Hitman. He's the founder and board member of Dream Change, as well as co-founder of Pachamama Alliance.

Photo by Eric Alan

Friday at the 45th Oregon Country Fair, KLCC's Eric Alan and John Cooney spoke with poet Jorah LaFleur with Eugene Poetry Slam.

Photo by Eric Alan

Friday at the Oregon Country Fair, KLCC's Eric Alan and John Cooney spoke with Michelle Holman of SLFR: Support Local Food Rights.

Rachael McDonald

The Oregon Country Fair features more than music, food, jugglers, acrobats and funny costumes. If you're looking for a shady spot for some live theater and laughs, the Morningwood Odditorium is the place for you. During pre-fair set up, KLCC's Rachael McDonald stopped by to talk with a couple of actors, Christopher Huson and Maque DaVis.

"Beauty and the Beast" is performed at noon and 3 o'clock each day of the fair at the Morningwood Odditorium.
 

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