Oregon legislature

droregon.org

As they continue to face a $1.6 billion budget shortfall, Oregon lawmakers will get an update on the state's financial outlook next week. The May revenue forecast is a key piece of information as budget-writers put together the next two-year spending plan.

Rachael McDonald

The University of Oregon faces a $25 million gap under Governor Kate Brown’s proposed budget. U of O administrators, students and alumni Thursday urged state lawmakers to put more money into higher education.

Rachael McDonald

The Oregon legislature’s Ways and Means Committee heard from nearly 200 people in a packed lecture hall at Lane Community College in Eugene Saturday. People urged lawmakers to increase funding for higher education, K through 12, health care, services for people with disabilities, public safety and more.

Matt Johnson / Flickr.com

A coalition of labor, community, and health groups are calling on Oregon lawmakers to ensure residents’ basic rights and opportunities are protected under the Trump administration.

Two bills approved during Oregon’s 2016 legislative session address sexual assault. One lifts the statute of limitation for first-degree sex crimes. The other puts procedures in place to process untested rape kits.

Chris Phan / Flickr

The Oregon Legislature wrapped up this year's short session, Thursday, approving a last batch of bills dealing with housing, phasing out coal power, and raising the state's minimum wage.

Oregon Democrats left the short legislative session today (Thursday) with at least two policy changes to be happy about. Governor Kate Brown signed a law that will increase the state’s minimum wage over the next five years. And lawmakers were able to approve a bill that will phase out coal fired power plants by 2030. KLCC’s Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman.

Lehman: “That’s something that Democrats say will contribute to cleaner air, but Republicans say, ‘well, it will just jack up electricity rates, and coal power is going to stick around regardless of what Oregon does.’”

Matt Howry / Flickr

The Oregon Legislature began its 35-day special session Monday, Feb. 1. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have different ideas about what this short session should and should not try to accomplish.

Matt Howry / Flickr

Correspondent Chris Lehman talks with KLCC's Rachael McDonald about the legislative session that begins February 1st in Salem.

The New Year brings more access to birth control for women in Oregon.
One law allows pharmacists to prescribe oral and patch contraceptives to women 18 and over.

Pages