Oregon State University

Joe Eilers

Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, is increasingly creating a global health threat and poorly monitored in the U.S. That's according to a report released by scientists at Oregon State University and the University of North Carolina.

Rachael McDonald

Scientists at Oregon State University have developed a wristband that can detect chemicals in the environment. Advocacy groups see them as a tool to help people to find out what they're being exposed to and eventually use the information to affect policy. And a new company hopes to sell the wristbands commercially.

oregonstate.edu

The Oregon legislature has approved a nearly 30 million dollar taxpayer bond for a new wood products lab and other additions at Oregon state university. 

According to Thomas Maness, Dean at the School of Forestry, the project will add new classrooms and research facilities, including a twenty thousand square foot laboratory focused on utilizing Oregon's wood products for a growing global demand:

Thomas Maness: "Architects and engineers are really looking for a solution to build larger buildings than we currently build out of sustainable materials."

Corinne Boyer

Oregon’s US Senator Jeff Merkley was in Eugene on Tuesday to discuss a study which measured human exposure to toxic chemicals.

The battle to prohibit the cultivation of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, continues in Oregon. In the upcoming special election, Benton County voters will decide if a measure to ban GMO's is right for them. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with people on both sides of the issue and filed this report.

On the face of it, Measure 2-89 seeks to protect local food sources by banning the cultivation of genetically modified crops anywhere in the county. The measure also promotes saving heritage seeds and a sort of “We the People” right to self-governance.

oregonstate.edu

Two Oregon State University students are set to leave for Nepal on Friday. Since the devastating earthquake struck over the weekend, they’ve been gathering and packing as many medical supplies as possible. 

Christian Nishioka and Cole Miller have been planning a trip to Nepal since January. They intend to make a film about CardioStart, a heart surgery non-profit. OSU professor Alina Padilla-Miller says the young men are part of her Transnational Transmedia class, which allows students to document organizations providing humanitarian aid to developing countries.

Last week, Governor Kate Brown declared drought emergency in two more Oregon counties—Wheeler and Baker. Currently, more than half of the state is eligible for emergency federal aid—and it's only April. KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert spoke with one of the state’s leading climatologists about regional drought and what the future holds.

Joey is crowd funding to raise money for his scientific studies. For more information, click here:

https://experiment.com/projects/discovering-plant-destroyers-in-south-africa-with-citizen-science

Oregon State University kicks off its annual Campus Wild project with a talk by John Marzluff, author of Welcome to Subirdia. He speaks with Eric Alan about how birds adapt to such things as traffic noise and Costco, and how we can increase the species diversity of our urban ecosystems. John Marzluff gives a free talk at OSU’s LaSells Stewart Center on Thursday, April 2nd, sponsored by the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word.

Oregon State University

Oregon State University professor Jane Lubchenco has had a long career building and promoting lines of connections between ocean health and human health.

Her work has carried her from the laboratory and classroom to the highest levels of public policy administration. She served as head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, from 2009 to 2013 and was recently named a US Science Envoy for the Ocean by the State Department.

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