Oregon school districts served over 20 thousand homeless students in the 2014-15 school year, an 8 percent increase from the previous year.

Meeting Date: Friday January 16th, 2015

Air Date: Monday January 19th, 2015

Nearly one in three working families in the United States and in Oregon has trouble meeting their basic needs. Middle-class families in Oregon are struggling to maintain that status. Women and working families striving to join Oregon’s middle class face more barriers than ever before.

Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek will talk about an “Opportunity Agenda” to address those issues built on three key platforms: expanding opportunity, rewarding work, and ensuring basic fairness.

Amanda Peacher / OPB

This week we’re talking to Oregonians across the state who struggle with hunger. Yesterday we checked in with Tyra Lynn. We interviewed her more than a decade ago about her experience with food stamps, now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP. Today, we spend time with Lynn and her sister Constance Lee, who has a different take on accepting SNAP.

Tyra Lynn is rolling pie dough in her sister’s home in Mountain Home, Idaho.

Lynn: We’re going to need more flour. I’ve got barely enough flour and I’ve only made one pie crust.

Tara Lynn

In 2000 Oregon had the highest rate of hunger in the nation. Around that time, OPB’s Rob Manning spoke with Portlander Tyra Lynn, who struggled to feed her family and relied on food stamps. This fall, OPB found Lynn. We wanted to know whether her situation changed more than a decade later.

Life was hard for Tyra Lynn twelve years ago. Her husband had just lost his job, and the then 27-year-old mother of three had a hard time making ends meet.   

Hunger's Challenges Multiply In Remote Parts Of Oregon

Jan 13, 2015
Amanda Peacher / OPB

People who live in cities usually have a grocery store or a food pantry option within a few miles. But in rural communities, access to groceries with affordable fresh food is harder to come by.

Amanda Peacher / OPB

Nearly 15 years ago, Oregon had the highest rate of hunger in the nation. The state changed a number of policies to try to help. But the percentage of people facing hunger today is nearly as high as it was in 2000. In this series, we talk to Oregonians who struggle to put food on the table, and look at programs that provide support. Amanda Peacher reports on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.


Despite Oregon having the 2nd highest minimum wage in the nation, low-wage workers in the state are finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet. That's the finding of a new report from the University of Oregon.

Bridge Meadows

Helping children in poverty needs to start with their parents. That's according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. There are approximately 126 thousand Oregon children under age 8 living below the poverty line. Most of their parents don't have a higher education degree and many don't have year round work. Children First for Oregon Spokeswoman Tonia Hunt says the State needs to work on ways to improve the family budget.

Oregon Center for Public Policy.

Despite economic growth, the number of Oregonians living in poverty is higher than it was during the 2008 recession. The Oregon Center for Public Policy has released poverty figures for 2013. KLCC’s Corinne Boyer has more.


Minority children in Oregon have fewer opportunities to emerge from poverty than their white peers. That's according to a report released earlier this week from the advocacy group, Children First for Oregon.