Senator Ron Wyden

Coos Bay Rail Link

U.S. Senators Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mike Crapo from Idaho introduced the Short Line Railroad Rehabilitation and Investment Act of 2015 on Tuesday.

The senators' proposed act would extend the maintenance tax credit for short line railroads nationally which expired in 2014. When the previous bill was enacted, short line railroads across the country received a 50 percent tax credit, or, up to $3,500 per mile of track owned.

Now that these funds are expired, railroad owners will have less money to pay for maintenance. Martin Callery from the Port of Coos Bay explains:

Anna King

As Congress prepares to adjourn next week, still unresolved is a pair of bills with wide-reaching implications for southern and western Oregon. Over the past year, Senator Ron Wyden has pushed hard for compromise measures that would address long-standing conflicts over logging and water. But now those bills are in limbo.

Nick Edwards / OPB

Oregon's Dungeness Crab season is set to begin on schedule this year December 1. The Coast Guard rescue helicopter based in Newport is set to be decommissioned December 15th, which has commercial crabbers and their families worried.

Karen Richards

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler held a roundtable in Eugene today to discuss retirement savings issues.

At the meeting on LCC's downtown campus, Senator Wyden and Treasurer Wheeler heard from a couple dozen students, retirees, and professionals. They were looking for ideas to help shape an Oregon plan for retirement security.

Wyden said the days of working for the same company for decades, and retiring with a healthy pension, have gone the way of black and white TV:

Desmond O'Boyle

While in Eugene last week, Oregon U.S. Senator Ron Wyden spoke with KLCC's Desmond O'Boyle about funding for rural parts of the state and the rising costs of fighting wildfires.

Senator Wyden has worked to renew The Secure Rural Schools Act several times, most recently in 2013. The Act ensures funding to rural areas not collecting the timber revenue at the rate they once did. Oregon's share of the Secure Rural Schools Act is more than 2 billion dollars annually. Wyden says as far as providing financial assistance to the State, this is a very important bill.

Meeting Date: Friday, September 26th, 2014

Air Date: Monday, September 29th, 2014

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden discusses privacy in the digital age.

Desmond O'Boyle

Oregon U.S. Senator Ron Wyden discussed protecting privacy in the digital age at the Club of Eugene, Friday.

As a longtime member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, the Democrat has been critical of government programs collecting large amounts of data on U.S. Citizens. Wyden is concerned the merging of communications systems worldwide will cause innocent Americans to be swept up in searches that target overseas terrorist threats.

Albany Democrat-Herald

A new long-term care home in Lebanon for Veterans is finished and will be dedicated, Saturday. The facility can house up to 154 residents and is named after a World War I Medal of Honor recipient from Corvallis.

The 40 million dollar facility broke ground in 2012 and focuses on rehabilitation services and long term care for veterans with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs Spokesman Jeremy Woodall is proud of the building.

Karen Richards

Oregon's U.S. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley were both in Eugene on Monday. They led a forum on the Department of Transportation's proposed changes to oil train transport.

Bakken shale oil production in the Dakotas has transformed railroad tank car movement across the west. Volumes have increased four thousand percent since 2008, according to the Association of American Railroads. Senator Ron Wyden says rules regarding safety and preparedness have not kept pace:

Devan Schwartz / Earthfix

A controversial method of logging is being tested on a Bureau of Land Management forest in Southern Oregon. The idea is to remove trees in the same way nature does. It’s being touted as a model for the Pacific Northwest.

Critics say it’s just a new twist on the same old problem: too much logging and not enough environmental protection.

Steep hillsides slant toward a bright blue sky. This section of forest, known as the Buck Rising site, is a checkboard landscape. It ranges from intact forests, to stands of thinned trees, to clearcuts.