sick leave

tallasiandude / Flickr

The Oregon legislature is expected to vote this week on statewide paid sick-leave. Eugene has passed its own sick leave ordinance, but, the mayor has asked to delay its implementation.

The Eugene ordinance was set to go into effect July 1st. Mayor Kitty Piercy says, with expectation of a state law mandating sick leave, it made sense to delay the city's rule. The state law would over-rule Eugene's. Piercy says this way businesses won't have to go through the adjustment twice.

tallasiandude / Flickr

The Oregon legislature could pass a paid sick leave law during this session. The City of Eugene recently passed its own ordinance effective July first.

The Eugene City council this week discussed putting a hold on implementation of the sick leave ordinance in case the statewide law differs from theirs. City Councilor Alan Zelenka:

tallasiandude / Flickr

The Eugene City Council has joined Seattle, Portland and San Francisco in approving a mandatory sick leave law. The ordinance passed Monday on a 5-3 vote.

Desmond O'Boyle

An overwhelming number of people attended the Eugene City Council's public comment hearing Monday night. Citizens packed Harris Hall to voice their concerns, support, or opposition to the proposed sick leave ordinance.

About 60 people commented on the proposed sick leave ordinance. Lindy Moore heads the Emerald Executive Association and opposes the ordinance.

Rachael McDonald

The Lane County Board of Commissioners has made the unprecedented move of barring cities in the county from passing laws that impact employment. The vote Monday morning is meant to pre-empt the City of Eugene's efforts to pass a sick leave ordinance.

Lane County

Lane County residents might be tempted to call in sick to work Monday to get to two important public hearings. Both of them have to do with Eugene's proposed sick leave ordinance. The public is invited to comment on three Lane County ordinances put forward in reaction to Eugene's efforts. The first exempts the county from Eugene's ordinance. The second exempts other cities in Lane County. The third actually prohibits municipalities from passing labor laws.

tallasiandude / Flickr

Eugene is looking to follow in the footsteps of Portland and Seattle with a sick leave ordinance. It would require employers to provide paid sick time to their workers within city limits. This endeavor has been welcomed by many low-wage workers and their advocates and met with dismay by many employers. The Lane County Board of Commissioners is trying to sideline the effort.

City of Eugene

Tuesday, the Lane County Board of Commissioners moved to stymie the City of Eugene's sick leave ordinance before it's passed. It's unclear what effect the county's actions will have.

The County Board proposed three ordinances in reaction to Eugene's proposed sick leave-- one would exempt county employees from the city's rule. Another would exempt other cities in the county from it, and a third forbids other cities in Lane County from making similar rules. The vote was 4 to 0, with Commissioner Sorenson absent.

Rachael McDonald

Lane County may throw a wrench in the City of Eugene's efforts to pass a sick leave ordinance.

The Board of County Commissioners Tuesday  moved forward on their own ordinance that exempts Lane County from the city's sick leave. It may also exempt any business outside Eugene and restrict the ability of other cities in Lane County from passing similar sick leave rules. Board Chair Pat Farr says there are a lot of unanswered questions about how the city's ordinance would affect county government and private businesses outside Eugene.

City of Eugene

The city of Eugene is considering a sick leave ordinance modeled after one recently passed in Portland. They discussed it at their meeting Wednesday. Not all councilors think it’s a good idea.

Councilor Mike Clark says a citywide sick leave ordinance would be great in an ideal world but…

Clark: "My concern here revolves around the fact that this will cost, in the real world, this will cost our community hundreds and hundreds of jobs."