solar eclipse

Steve Wyatt

One month from today, more than a million visitors are expected to be in Oregon for the total solar eclipse. Planning has been going on for years and is kicking into high gear. On the coast there are special concerns – and opportunities – for residents and tourists.

NASA

The total solar eclipse is 2 months away. Scientists shared their excitement at a NASA briefing Wednesday, but transportation officials in Oregon, and other states the eclipse will pass over, are bracing for cosmic traffic jams.

Wikipedia

Communities in the path of totality for the upcoming solar eclipse are preparing for huge crowds on August 21st. Roughly half-a-million people are expected to converge on the Corvallis area for the eclipse.

At her desk in the Madras city offices, Lysa Vattimo hauls out a fat binder full of documents, maps and lists. This is Madras’ solar eclipse plan.

"And it has a little bit of everything in it," Vattimo said flipping through the pages. "From port-a-potties to the public safety plan, where fire engines will be staged, where police will be staged."'

The eclipse will only last about two hours, with just two minutes of complete darkness. But those two minutes amount to months of planning for communities in the 70-mile viewing belt, otherwise known as the path of totality.

Wikipedia

Oregon State University will hold a 3-day festival during the August 21st solar eclipse.  They’ll be providing limited lodging in their dorms for visitors.

IrfanView

The Oregon State Parks Foundation hopes “eclipse fever” will help boost their membership. The non-profit will soon auction off 30 campsites within the path of totality for the solar eclipse on August 21st.