tree

US Forest Service

Given the warm end to last summer and drier than normal winter, the Oregon Department of Forestry expects a higher chance of trees dying from drought or secondary attack by bark beetles this summer. The agency encourages tree and forest owners to watch for continuing drought symptoms like dead tops, dead branches, thinning canopies and stressed cone crops.

Cameron Yee

Fallen trees from the recent ice storm in the South Willamette Valley can still be seen littering parks and yards.  After the storm, it became obvious that certain kinds of trees were damaged more than others.  KLCC wondered why.

Alby Thoumsin is an arborist with Eugene’s Sperry Tree Care.  He says Oregon white oaks, silver maples and sweet gums were hit the hardest during the ice storm.  The reason has to do with the silhouette of the trees.  Vase-shaped trees sustained more damage than those shaped like cones.