University of Oregon

Scott McGuffin

Arsenic in drinking water supplies is a worldwide problem. A discovery by scientists at the University of Oregon could lead to a new way to remove the toxic chemical, making groundwater supplies safer for communities.

Call it a cleanse. Or detoxification. That’s basically the process happening in groundwater, identified by University of Oregon geology professor Qusheng Jin.

He tested well-water in Creswell, Oregon, and found microbes are naturally transforming toxic water-born arsenic into a gas that can rise and get trapped in the soil, where it’s less of a problem.

Tiffany Eckert

KLCC's Tiffany Eckert visits the mass vaccination clinic at Matthew Knight Arena on the University of Oregon campus. The newly approved vaccine Trumenba is being administered to any undergraduate who wants it. As students trickle in for the vaccination, Tiffany spoke with Andre Le Duc, Executive Director of Enterprise Risk Services.

Tiffany Eckert

The second day of the "mass vax" clinic at the University of Oregon saw fewer students than anticipated. Pharmacists lined the halls of Matthew Knight Arena with Meningitis vaccinations at the ready. According to one care provider, students have been "trickling in."

Undergrad students who do show up are being walked through health questions and insurance paperwork. The UO is partnering with Albertson's and Safeway pharmacies to process insurance claims to the myriad providers, many of whom just approved coverage of the vaccine, Trumenba.

Tiffany Eckert

Institutional response to the Meningococcal Group B outbreak at the University of Oregon has become a lesson in prevention.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have joined county and state authorities to coordinate the largest on-campus vaccination clinic in recent history. A campus-wide ad campaign uses the phrase "Get the Vax" to encourage students to show up at Matthew Knight Arena for the shot.

uoregon.edu

The University of Oregon filed an amended response yesterday (Thursday) to a student’s lawsuit claiming she was raped by three former basketball players.

In the revised response, the U of O removed language seeking reimbursement of legal costs. Interim president Scott Coltrane says they never intended to ask for fees or damages from the claimant:

Coltrane: “We felt it was important to do this now, because the attention was going toward the misperception that we were suing our student, which was not the truth.”

Shotimage

Staff, volunteer nurses and EMT’s are giving Meningitis vaccines to University of Oregon students at a staggering pace. Public Health officials say ten percent of the student population has received the shot so far. Meanwhile, Lane County Public Health continues to investigate the Meningitis outbreak.

Public Health officials have yet to confirm which of the sickened students is the “sentinel case,” – the one who contracted the disease first. They continue to evaluate several people but say there are currently no suspected cases.

Tiffany Eckert

In the wake of a Meningitis outbreak at the University of Oregon, health officials are stepping up a vaccination program. Due to demand, a temporary clinic opened Monday in Mathew Knight arena to vaccinate students who want to be immunized as soon as possible. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert was there.

Since Monday morning, more than 700 students have received the vaccination for Meningococcal Group B, the disease that has sickened three students and caused the death of freshman athlete Lauren Jones.

Mike Eyster is Executive Director of the University Health Center.

Tiffany Eckert

The State Medical Examiner's Office has now confirmed the death of an 18-year old U of O student athlete was caused by a highly contagious Meningitis infection.

Half way through a press conference Friday afternoon, Senior Public Health Officer Dr. Pat Luedtke was handed a note. Then he announced:

Dr. Luedtke: "We heard from the medical examiner's office that due to a preponderance of evidence, he will be signing the death certificate that in fact this fourth case is Neisseria meningitides sero group B related to the outbreak. So that would confirm four cases."

GoDucks.com

Lauren Jones, a University of Oregon student athlete passed away after seeking medical attention on Tuesday. A bacterial infection was suspected to be the cause of her death, but the autopsy results are inconclusive.

KLCC

The search for a new University of Oregon president has collected 250 nominations so far. The deadline for applicants is March 9th.

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