University of Oregon

University of Oregon

As the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on the constitutionality of gay marriage as soon as Friday, a  University of Oregon researcher found no harmful effects for children of same-sex parents. The study was published in the journal "Social Science Research".

Jes Burns

Oregon Health Officials have confirmed a seventh case of meningococcal disease linked to the outbreak at the University of Oregon. 

The spring concert of the Women’s Choral Society of Eugene marks both its 80th anniversary season, and its last performance with music director Jim Steinberger, who’s retiring after 24 years. He speaks with Eric Alan about the group, its aims and his experience, before the performance at the UO’s Beall Hall on May 29th. 

https://international.uoregon.edu/Gustavo_Germano_Lecture

This Wednesday world renowned photographer Gustavo Germano will present his exhibit about people disappeared by Argentinean dictators.

From 1976 to 1983 an estimated 30,000 people were kidnapped by the government during the military dictatorship in Argentina.

Gustavo Germano's 18 year old brother, Eduardo disappeared. His remains were found last year. The photographer now uses that personal experience for his exhibit "ausencias" –absences, which is on display at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

The Center for Community Counseling presents “Stand Up for Mental Health” at the Wildish Theater in Springfield on Saturday, May 2nd. Headlining the event will be Dax Jordan, Los Angeles-based comedian who is a graduate of the University of Oregon, and personally familiar with issues of depression. Dax Jordan joins Eric Alan for conversation and comedy.

Oregon Geology, One Road at a Time

Apr 15, 2015
Photo by Marli Miller

The Eugene Natural History Society presents a talk by Marli Miller, author of the new second edition of Roadside Geology of Oregon, on Friday evening, April 17th, in the UO’s Willamette Hall. She speaks with Eric Alan about Oregon’s geologic wonders, and how the perspective of geologic time affects how we live in the present moment.

Tiffany Eckert

The search is over. The board of trustees voted today to name the 18th President of the University of Oregon.

Michael H. Schill has been chosen as the next U of O President. Schill is currently Dean at the University of Chicago-Law School.

Schill is a first generation college graduate--he attended Princeton.  Calling public universities “gems,” Schill says he’s proud and excited to be a Duck.

“This is an opportunity to take a great school, a proud school, an exciting school and move it forward. This is an absolutely pivotal moment for this university.”

In the months and weeks after six cases of Meningitis-B appeared on campus-- killing one student---the University of Oregon continues communication with students and parents about vaccination efforts. The college reports that students are still coming in for shots. However, data on the vaccination rates among the highest-risk groups on campus is still not available.

City of Redmond

The University of Oregon's Sustainable City Year Program is moving east of the Cascades for the first time in its six year history.

The program brings together UO students and faculty with members of a different Oregon city each year. Redmond has been selected and will benefit from more than 40,000 hours of student work aimed at improving sustainability, infrastructure and livability. Redmond's Community Development Director Heather Richards says they're getting started April 8 with a bicycle tour of existing infrastructure.

Two of the University of Oregon’s six library archivists are without their jobs following the release of thousands of presidential documents to a professor.

James Fox and Kira Homo were put on paid administrative leave in January. According to the administration they were responsible for the un-processed handoff of over 20,000 pages of correspondence.

In a statement, spokesman Tobin Klinger says Homo resigned her position and Fox will not return to his job, nor will his contract be renewed.

University of Oregon

The life of former University of Oregon President Dave Frohnmayer was celebrated Saturday in a public memorial service at Matthew Knight Arena on the U of O campus in Eugene. Frohnmayer served as state Attorney General, was a state legislator and was dean of the U of O law school. Oregon U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, State Senator Betsy Johnson and family members spoke of Frohnmayer's accomplishments and character.

His son Mark Frohnmayer quoted one of his father's students:

This week is spring break for all the major universities and school districts in Oregon. With that in mind, officials are urging drivers to be extra cautious.

In addition to in-state vacationers, roads may be swelled by travelers from California, which also has many schools on break. Shelley Snow is with the Oregon Department of Transportation. She says the Fourth of July is the most deadly time on the roads, but drivers shouldn’t be complacent this time of year: 

Health Officials Urge U of O Students To Get Meningococcal Vaccine

Mar 20, 2015

The state confirmed Thursday a sixth student from the University of Oregon has come down with meningococcal disease. Health officials want parents to persuade students to get vaccinated over Spring Break.

So far, one student has died, a second was seriously ill on a ventilator and three others missed classes. Now, another student has come down with the disease.
Lane County Public Health officer, Dr. Patrick Luedtke  , would only say he's a 20-year-old sophomore who lives off campus.

A fifth University of Oregon student has tested positive for the meningococcemia bacteria. This is the first confirmed case since a student died of the illness last month.

The student is a sophomore who lives at the Capstone complex in downtown Eugene. He was diagnosed Thursday with the bacteria that can cause a deadly blood infection. Mike Eyster is Executive Director of the U of O Health Center. He says they alerted the campus community immediately:

Scott McGuffin

Arsenic in drinking water supplies is a worldwide problem. A discovery by scientists at the University of Oregon could lead to a new way to remove the toxic chemical, making groundwater supplies safer for communities.

Call it a cleanse. Or detoxification. That’s basically the process happening in groundwater, identified by University of Oregon geology professor Qusheng Jin.

He tested well-water in Creswell, Oregon, and found microbes are naturally transforming toxic water-born arsenic into a gas that can rise and get trapped in the soil, where it’s less of a problem.

Tiffany Eckert

KLCC's Tiffany Eckert visits the mass vaccination clinic at Matthew Knight Arena on the University of Oregon campus. The newly approved vaccine Trumenba is being administered to any undergraduate who wants it. As students trickle in for the vaccination, Tiffany spoke with Andre Le Duc, Executive Director of Enterprise Risk Services.

Tiffany Eckert

The second day of the "mass vax" clinic at the University of Oregon saw fewer students than anticipated. Pharmacists lined the halls of Matthew Knight Arena with Meningitis vaccinations at the ready. According to one care provider, students have been "trickling in."

Undergrad students who do show up are being walked through health questions and insurance paperwork. The UO is partnering with Albertson's and Safeway pharmacies to process insurance claims to the myriad providers, many of whom just approved coverage of the vaccine, Trumenba.

Tiffany Eckert

Institutional response to the Meningococcal Group B outbreak at the University of Oregon has become a lesson in prevention.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have joined county and state authorities to coordinate the largest on-campus vaccination clinic in recent history. A campus-wide ad campaign uses the phrase "Get the Vax" to encourage students to show up at Matthew Knight Arena for the shot.

uoregon.edu

The University of Oregon filed an amended response yesterday (Thursday) to a student’s lawsuit claiming she was raped by three former basketball players.

In the revised response, the U of O removed language seeking reimbursement of legal costs. Interim president Scott Coltrane says they never intended to ask for fees or damages from the claimant:

Coltrane: “We felt it was important to do this now, because the attention was going toward the misperception that we were suing our student, which was not the truth.”

Shotimage

Staff, volunteer nurses and EMT’s are giving Meningitis vaccines to University of Oregon students at a staggering pace. Public Health officials say ten percent of the student population has received the shot so far. Meanwhile, Lane County Public Health continues to investigate the Meningitis outbreak.

Public Health officials have yet to confirm which of the sickened students is the “sentinel case,” – the one who contracted the disease first. They continue to evaluate several people but say there are currently no suspected cases.

Tiffany Eckert

In the wake of a Meningitis-like outbreak at the University of Oregon, health officials are stepping up a vaccination program. Due to demand, a temporary clinic opened Monday in Mathew Knight arena to vaccinate students who want to be immunized as soon as possible. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert was there.

Since Monday morning, more than 700 students have received the vaccination for Meningococcal Group B, the disease that has sickened three students and caused the death of freshman athlete Lauren Jones.

Mike Eyster is Executive Director of the University Health Center.

Tiffany Eckert

The Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office has now confirmed the death of an 18-year old University of Oregon student athlete was caused by a highly contagious Meningitis infection.

Half way through a press conference Friday afternoon, Senior Public Health Officer Dr. Pat Luedtke was handed a note. Then he announced:

GoDucks.com

Lauren Jones, a University of Oregon student athlete passed away after seeking medical attention on Tuesday. A bacterial infection was suspected to be the cause of her death, but the autopsy results are inconclusive.

KLCC

The search for a new University of Oregon president has collected 250 nominations so far. The deadline for applicants is March 9th.

U of O Economics Professor Bill Harbaugh has been in the news recently for his controversial acquisition of internal administrative U of O communications.  Tuesday he chimed in on football coach Mark Helfrich's new five-year, $17 million contract.

Harbaugh says the U of O's success in football comes at the expense of the University as a whole:

Harbaugh: "It's probably a mistake for the University to be so invested in big-time sports, particularly college football.  The University as a whole would be better off with a team that won half the games and had half the budget."

UPDATE: Lane County Health officials said Wednesday a third person has been hospitalized with a potential case of Meningococcemia.

Lane County health officials are looking for connections between the recent diagnosis of Meningococcemia– a blood infection that causes meningitis - and the case diagnosed last month. Both women with the diagnosis are University of Oregon Students.

An epidemiological team will collect samples from the two women and send them to the state lab where they will be compared. The results will be released in a few days.

Recorded on Friday, January 30th, 2015

Air Date: Monday, February 2nd, 2015

Friday, January 30, 2015 from 12:05 to 1:20 p.m.
Downtown Athletic Club, 3rd Floor Ballroom

Visitor7

The University of Oregon says 22,000 pages of archived documents that were released illegally have been returned.

Why The UO Wants Those Documents Back

Jan 27, 2015
KLCC

An unnamed professor was able to procure 22,000 pages of documents from the University of Oregon Archives earlier this month. The administration is demanding those documents back citing privacy concerns. It's place 2 archivists on leave. KLCC's Tripp Sommer talks with Register-Guard Higher Education reporter Diane Dietz.

KLCC

The University of Oregon is being tight-lipped about the recent release of 22,000 pages of documents it says were checked out illegally to an unnamed library patron.

Tobin Klinger, University spokesman, says the administration is in contact with the patron and wants the documents returned. Two people are on paid leave, but Klinger would not confirm whether they are librarians or even work at the library.

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