U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Cascadia Wildlands

Federal wildlife officials are taking a new look at the status of the threatened northern spotted owl. Despite decades of efforts to save the species, it could soon be considered endangered.

A California conservation group petitioned the Department of the Interior in 2012 to change the status of the spotted owl under the Endangered Species Act. The group argued that owl populations are still on the decline because of habitat loss and the incursion of the barred owl, especially in Washington and Northern Oregon.


With a shrinking population and habitat, the greater sage-grouse is being considered for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Endangered Species Act. States, including Oregon, have been working collaboratively on proactive measures to prevent the listing and reduce the threats facing sage-grouse.

Whale Cove Becomes Protected Wildlife Refuge

Jan 22, 2015
Oregon Department of Transportation

Whale Cove on the central coast is now a protected part of the Oregon Island National Wildlife Refuge. A deal between the property owners and government and non-profit organizations was reached to safeguard marine life and its ecology.

Before Whale Cove was protected, several proposals were made to develop the land. Bryce and Beebe Buchanan purchased the property hoping to conserve it. They sold it for nearly half its value so federal funding and grants could be used for the deal.


More funds will soon be available to Oregon farmers and landowners who choose to use non-lethal deterrent techniques for wolves.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture just received a $53,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to be used for non-lethal preventative measures. Those may include barriers, alarms, or animals to guard the livestock. ODA Program Director Jason Barber says the most efficient method to prevent wolf attacks are range riders.

Oregon Department of Agriculture

The federal government is counting on Willamette Valley farmers to help the recovery of a threatened bird. This fall, the streaked horned lark was added to the endangered species list.

The bird prefers open habitat, which has been declining, so it's showing up on agricultural land. Typically, finding an endangered species on your land would prohibit any disturbance to the area. But in this case, an exemption will not penalize farmers who find the lark on their property.