Whooping Cough

Whooping Cough is on the rise in Oregon. Deschutes County health officials report more than 20 cases since the first of the year. Lane County has confirmed nine.

The bacterial infection, Pertussis, is also known as whooping cough. The Chinese named it the "hundred day cough"—because of the severe spells it elicits.

(Cough sounds…)

According to the World Health Organization, 195,000 children die from the disease each year. Whooping cough is easily spread through coughs and sneezes.

Benton County Children Diagnosed With Pertussis

Dec 3, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

Children ages 10 to 14 have been diagnosed with Pertussis in Philomath, Monroe and Corvallis. Making sure children and adults are vaccinated against whooping cough is an important preventative measure.

Benton County Public Information Officer Rick Osborn says Pertussis cases are serious and can be fatal in infants.

Wikimedia Commons

Lane County Public Health will offer free vaccinations against Whooping cough Friday for adults. The agency has 500 vaccines available to administer at Charnelton Clinic in Eugene.

T-dap shots vaccinate against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough.  Lane County Public Health Doctor Patrick Luedke says adults need to get a booster shot even if they were vaccinated as children. He says in the last 20 years or so, more people have opted out of getting the vaccine.

Grook Da Oger

Deschutes County Health Services has identified six confirmed cases of Pertussis, or Whooping Cough. This is an increase from last year where there were only three.

Tom Kuhn, a Community Health Manager at Deschutes County Health Services says they’re looking into what’s causing the larger outbreak this year.  

Kuhn:  “We don’t have any sources that we’ve identified or any really concrete links to all these cases. There are some cases that are linked but then there are some that are not. So, we really haven’t pinpointed what the cause of this is.”