wildlife

Wildlife
7:38 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Lead Bullets Could Be Endangered By The California Condor's Arrival In Oregon

Portland Audubon WIldlife Care Center workers Lacy Campbell and Deb Scheaffer tend to an injured red-tail hawk.
Alexi Horowitz Earthfix

As hunting season begins across the Pacific Northwest, Oregon conservationists and state agencies are taking a new look at the issue of lead ammunition and its effects on wildlife.

Inside the operating room at the Portland Audubon Society Wildlife Care Center head veterinarian Deb Shaeffer is carefully inserting a syringe into the shoulder of an injured red-tail hawk.

Shaeffer: “It’s a very simple blood draw, it takes one drop of blood, and we run it through a machine, and it takes about three minutes and we get a result back.”

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Wildlife
10:14 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Sad-looking Shorebirds On Oregon Beaches Should Be Left Alone

This time of year Common Murre's are fledging. Not all of them make it.
Credit Rachael McDonald

People walking Oregon's beaches this fall may come across juvenile shorebirds that seem to be distressed or ill. Wildlife experts say it's best to leave them be.

The Common Murre is a small shorebird with black and white feathers, kind of like a mini- penguin. This time of year, the young ones have just fledged and are learning to feed themselves.
Laura Todd is with US Fish and Wildlife's Newport field office. She says some of them don't survive. If you come across a bird that's not moving and seems weak and unwell…

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wildlife
11:09 am
Tue March 18, 2014

A Second Cougar Is Killed Near Eugene Park

This photo taken with a trail camera Friday shows a cougar that's believed to still be in or around Hendrick's Park
Credit Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Oregon wildlife biologists have trapped and killed a second cougar near Hendricks Park in Eugene. A trap was set for a third cougar believed to be in the area. 

Last week, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife trapped and killed an adult female suspected of killing goats and chickens at a home near the park.
Dennehy: "We set a trail camera at the site and that revealed the presence of a 2nd young cougar. That cougar entered the empty coop where the chickens had been killed last week."

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Wildlife
12:40 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Cougar Blamed For Killing Livestock Is Put Down

Credit Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

A cougar blamed for killing goats and chickens at a home near Hendrick's Park in Eugene has been trapped and killed.

The cougar visited a property that abuts Hendricks Park for four consecutive nights, killing two goats and some chickens. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife trapped the 84-pound female Tuesday morning in a cage took it away and euthanized it. District Wildlife Biologist, Brian Wolfer says there was potential for the cougar to keep killing livestock and domestic animals, even if it was relocated.

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Wildlife
7:14 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Killing One Owl Species To Save Another

Biologist Lowell Diller bands a spotted owl on forest lands owned by the Green Diamond Resource Company in Humboldt County.
Liam Moriarty, JPR

It’s been nearly 20 years since the Northwest Forest Plan scaled back logging across the region, in large part to preserve habitat for the endangered northern spotted owl. But the spotted owl continues to decline. Scientists blame the larger, more aggressive barred owl for pushing the spotted owl out of its natural habitat. Now, federal wildlife managers have begun shooting barred owls to see if removing the competition will allow spotted owls to recover. A look at the controversy over the wisdom -- and ethics -- of killing one owl species to save another.

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Wildlife
6:00 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Rodent Poisoning Harms Wildlife, Raptors

Credit audobonmagazine.com

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife noticed an uptick of wild animals killed by rodent poison this fall.

ODFW Veterinarian Julia Burco says a lot of times, the problem stems from people not reading directions carefully enough. She says people may notice they have rodent problems but might not think of the consequences of other animals directly or indirectly ingesting bait.

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